- skip - Brewer’s

Fleurs-de-Lys

.

In the reign of Louis VII. (1137–1180) the national standard was thickly charged with flowers. In 1365 the number was reduced by Charles VI. to three (the mystical church number). Guillim, in his Display; of Heraldrie, 1611, says the device is “Three toads erect, saltant;” in allusion to which Nostradaʹmus, in the sixteenth century, calls Frenchmen crapauds (toads). Recently it has been thought that the device is really a “bee flying,” because certain ornaments resembling bees were found in the tomb of Childeric, father of Clovis, when it was opened in 1653. These bees are now generally believed to be the fleurons of horse-trappings, and quite independent of the emblem.

The fleur-de-lys or lily-flower was chosen by Flavio Gioʹja to mark the north point of the compass, out of compliment to the King of Naples, who was of French descent (1302).

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Fleet Street (London)
Fleet of the Desert
Flemish Account
Flemish School
Flesh and Blood
Flesh-pots
Fleshed
Fleshly School (The)
Fleta
Fleur-de-Luce
Fleurs-de-Lys
Flibbertigibbet
Flic (French)
Flick
Flies
Fling
Fling Herself at my Head (To)
Flins [a stone]
Flint
Flint Implements
Flint Jack

Linking here:

Luce