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Garland (g hard)

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“A chaplet should be composed of four roses … and a garland should be formed of laurel or oak leaves, interspersed with acorns.”—J. E. Cussans: Handbook of Heraldry, chap. vii. p. 105.

Garland. A collection of ballads in True Loversʹ Garland, etc.

Nuptial garlands are as old as the hills. The ancient Jews used them, according to Selden (Uxor Heb., iii. 655); the Greek and Roman brides did the same (Vaughan, Golden Grove); so did the Anglo-Saxons and Gauls.

“Thre ornamentys pryncipaly to a wyfe: A rynge on hir fynger, a broch on hir brest, and a garlond on hir hede. The rynge betokenethe true love; the broch clennesse in herte and chastitye; the garlond … gladness and the dignity of the sacrement of wedlock.”—Leland: Dives and Pauper (1493).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Gardarike
Garden (g hard)
Gardener (g hard)
Gardening (g hard)
Gargamelle
Gargantua (g hard)
Gargantuan
Gargittios
Gargouille, or Gargoil (g hard)
Garibaldi’s Red Shirt
Garland (g hard)
Garlick
Garnish (g hard)
Garratt (g hard)
Garraway’s
Garrote or Garotte
Garter (g hard)
Garvies
Gasconade
Gaston (g hard)
Gastrolators