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Gird up the Loins (To)

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To prepare for hard work or a journey. The Jews wore a girdle only when at work or on a journey. Even to the present day, Eastern people, who wear loose dresses, gird them about the loins.

“The loose tunic was an inconvenient walking dress; therefore, when persons went from home, they tied a girdle round it (2 Kings iv. 2; ix. 1; Isaiah v. 27; Jeremiah i. 17; John xxi. 7; Acts xii. 8).”—Jahn: Archeologia Biblica (section 121).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Gingerly
Gingham
Ginnunga Gap
Giona (g soft)
Giotto
Giovanni (Don)
Gipsy (g soft)
Gipsy (The)
Giralda (g soft)
Gird
Gird up the Loins (To)
Girder (A)
Girdle (g hard)
Girdle (Florimel’s)
Girdle (St. Colman’s)
Girdle of Venus
Girl
Girondists (g soft)
Girouette
Gis (g soft)
Gitanos