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Hawthorn

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in florology, means “Good Hope,” because it shows the winter is over and spring is at hand. The Athenian girls used to crown themselves with hawthorn flowers at weddings, and the marriage-torch was made of hawthorn. The Romans considered it a charm against sorcery, and placed leaves of it on the cradles of new-born infants.

⁂ The hawthorn was chosen by Henry VII. for his device, because the crown of Richard III. was discovered in a hawthorn bush at Bosworth.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Havering (Essex)
Haversack
Havock
Havre (France)
Hawk
Hawk and Handsaw
Hawk nor Buzzard (Neither)
Hawker’s News
Hawkubites
Hawse-hole
Hawthorn
Hay, Hagh, or Haugh
Hayston (Frank)
Hayward
Hazazel
Hazel
Hazel-nut
Head
Head Shaved (Get your)
Head and Ears
Head and Shoulders