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Havock

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A military cry to general massacre without quarter. This cry was forbidden in the ninth year of Richard II. on pain of death. Probably it was originally used in hunting wild beasts, such as wolves, lions, etc., that fell on sheepfolds, and Shakespeare favours this suggestion in his Julius Cœsar, where he says Até shall “cry havock! and let slip the dogs of war.” (Welsh, hafog, devastation; Irish, arvach; compare Anglo-Saxon havoc, a hawk.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hautville Coit
Have a Care!
Have a Mind for it (To)
Have at You
Have it Out (To)
Havelok
Haver-Cakes
Haveril
Havering (Essex)
Haversack
Havock
Havre (France)
Hawk
Hawk and Handsaw
Hawk nor Buzzard (Neither)
Hawker’s News
Hawkubites
Hawse-hole
Hawthorn
Hay, Hagh, or Haugh
Hayston (Frank)