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Hob and Nob

together. To drink as cronies, to clink glasses, to drink tête-à-tête. In the old English houses there was a hob at each corner of the hearth for heating the beer, or holding what one wished to keep hot. This was from the verb habban (to hold). The little round table set at the elbow was called a nob; hence to hob-nob was to drink snugly and cosily in the chimney-corner, with the beer hobbed, and a little nob-table set in the snuggery. (See Hob Nob.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hit
Hit it Off (To)
Hit the Nail on the Head (To)
Hitch
Hivites
Hoâng
Hoare
Hoarstone
Hoax
Hob
Hob and Nob
Hobbema
Hobbididance
Hobbinol
Hobbism
Hobbler
Hobby
Hobby-horse
Hobedy-hoig
Hobgoblin
Hobinol