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Hitch

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There is some hitch. Some impediment. A horse is said to have a hitch in his gait when he is lame. (Welsh, hecian, to halt or limp.)

To hitch. To get on smoothly; to fit in consistently: as, “You and I hitch on well together;” “These two accounts do not hitch in with each other.” A lame horse goes about jumping, and to jump together is to be in accord. So the two meanings apparently contradictory hitch together. Compare prevent, meaning to aid and to resist.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Hired Grief
Hiren
Hispania
Historicus
History
History of Croyland Abbey
Histrionic
Hit
Hit it Off (To)
Hit the Nail on the Head (To)
Hitch
Hivites
Hoâng
Hoare
Hoarstone
Hoax
Hob
Hob and Nob
Hobbema
Hobbididance
Hobbinol