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Idʹiot

meant originally a private person, one not engaged in any public office. Hence Jeremy Taylor says, “Humility is a duty in great ones, as well as in idiots” (private persons). The Greeks have the expressions, “a priest or an idiot” (layman), “a poet or an idiot” (prose-writer). As idiots were not employed in public offices, the term became synonymous with incompetency to fulfil the duties thereof. (Greek, idioʹtēs.) (See Baron.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ichor (I-kor)
Ichthus
Icon Basilike
Iconoclasts (Greek, “image breakers”)
Idæan Mother
Idealism
Idealists
Ides
Idiom
Idiosyncrasy
Idiot
Idle Lake
Idle Wheel
Idle Worms
Idleness
Idol Shepherd (The)
Idomeneus
Iduna or Idun
Ifakins
Ifreet or Afreet or Afrit
Ifurin

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Baron