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Immuʹring (Latin)

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Burying in a wall. The Vestal virgins among the Romans, and the nuns among the Roman Catholics, who broke their vows of chastity, were buried in a niche sufficiently large to contain their body with a small pittance of bread and water. The sentence of immuring was Vade in pace, or more correctly, Vade in pacem (Go into peacei.e. eternal rest). Some years ago a skelton, believed to be the remains of an immured nun, was discovered in the walls of Coldingham Abbey.

The immuring of Constance, a nun who had broken her vows, forms a leading incident in Scott’s poem of Marmion.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Imbrocata
Imbroglio (Italian)
Immaculate Conception
Immolate
Immortal (The)
Immortal Four of Italy (The)
Immortal Three (The)
Immortal Tinker (The)
Immortals
Immortality
Immuring (Latin)
Imogen
Imogine
Imp (Anglo-Saxon)
Imp of Darkness (An)
Impanation
Impannata
Impar Congressus Achilli
Imperial (An)
Imperium in Imperio
Impertinence

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Vestal Virgin