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Mandarinʹ

is not a Chinese word, but one given by the Portuguese colonists at Macaʹo to the officials called by the natives Khiouping (3 syl.) It is from the verb mandar (to command).

The nine ranks of mandarins are distinguished by the button in their cap:—1, ruby; 2, coral; 3, sapphire; 4, an opaque blue stone; 5, crystal; 6, an opaque white shell; 7, wrought gold; 8. plain gold; and 9, silver.

“The whole body of Chinese mandarins consists of twenty-seven members. They are appointed for (1) imperial birth; (2) long service; (3) illustrious deeds; (4) knowledge; (5) ability; (6) zeal; (7) nobility; and (8) aristocratic birth.”—Gutzlay.

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Man of Three Letters
Man-of-War (A)
Man of Wax
Man of Whipcord (A)
Manche (French)
Manchester
Manchester Poet
Manciple (A)
Mandamus (Latin)
Mandana
Mandarin
Mandeville (Bernard de)
Mandousians
Mandrabul
Mandrake
Mandricardo
Manduce
Manes
Manfred
Manger or Manger le Morceau
Manheim

See Also:

Mandarin