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Manes

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To appease his Mānes. To do when a person is dead what would have pleased him or was due to him when alive. The spirit or ghost of the dead was by the Romans called his Manes, which never slept quietly in the grave so long as survivors left its wishes unfulfilled. The 19th February was the day when all the living sacrificed to the shades of dead relations and friends.

Manes (2 syl.) from the old word manis, i.e. “bonus” “quod eos venerantes manes vocarent, ut Græci chrēstous.” (See Lucretius, iii. 52.) It cannot come from măneo, to remain (because this part of man remains after the body is dead), because the a is long.

In the Christian Church there is an All Soulsʹ Day.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Manciple (A)
Mandamus (Latin)
Mandana
Mandarin
Mandeville (Bernard de)
Mandousians
Mandrabul
Mandrake
Mandricardo
Manduce
Manes
Manfred
Manger or Manger le Morceau
Manheim
Mani
Mani, Manes, or Manichæus
Manichæans or Manichees
Manitou
Manlian Orders
Manly
Manna (Exodus xvi. 15)

See Also:

Manes