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Marches (boundaries)

is the Saxon mearc; but marsh, a meadow, is the Saxon mersc, anciently written marash, the French marais, and our morass. The other march is the origin of our marquis, the lord of the march. The boundaries between England and Wales, and between England and Scotland, were called “marches.”

Riding the marchesi.e. beating the bounds of the parish (Scotch).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Maranatha (Syriac, the Lord will comei.e. to execute judgment)
Maravedi
Marbles
Marcassin (The Prince)
Marcella
Marcellina
Marcellus (in Dibdin’s Bibliomania, a romance,)
March
March Dust
March Hare
Marches (boundaries)
Marchaundes Tale (in Chaucer)
Marching Watch
Marchington (Staffordshire)
Marchioness (The)
Marchpane
Marcionites
Marck (William de la)
Marcley Hill (Herefordshire)
Marcos de Obregon
Marcosians