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Wales

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The older form is Wealhas (plural of Wealh), an Anglo-Saxon word denoting foreigners, and applied by them to the ancient Britons; hence, also, Corn-wall, the horn occupied by the same “refugees.” Wälschland is a German name for Italy; Valais are the non-German districts of Switzerland; the parts about Liège constitute the Walloon country. The Welsh proper are Cimbri, and those driven thither by the Teutonic invaders were refugees or strangers. (See Walnut.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Waistcoat
Waiters upon Providence
Waits
Wake
“Waking a Witch.”
Walbrook Ward (London)
Walcheren Expedition
Waldemar’s Way
Waldenses
Waldo
Wales
Walk (in Hudibras)
Walk Chalks
Walk Spanish
Walk not in the Public Ways
Walk the Plank (To)
Walk through One’s Part (To)
Walker
Walker’s Bus
Walking Gentleman (A)
Walking Sword (A)

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Walloons

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Wales