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Martinmas

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The feast of St. Martin is November 11. His Martinmas will come, as it does to every hog—i.e. all must die.

⁂ November was the great slaughter-time of the Anglo-Saxons, when beeves, sheep, and hogs, whose store of food was exhausted, were killed and salted. Martinmas, therefore, was the slaying time, and the proverb intimates that our slaying-time or day of death will come as surely as that of a hog at St. Martin’s-tide.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Martial
Martian Laws
Martin
Martin
Martin Drunk
Martin of Bullions (St.)
Martin’s Running Footman (St.)
Martin’s Summer (St.)
Martine
Martinet
Martinmas
Martyr (Greek
Marvedie (A)
Marvellous
Mary
Mary
Mary
Marys
Mary Anne or Marianne
Mary Anne Associations
Mary Magdalene (St.)