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Nadab

,

in Dryden’s satire of Absalom and Achitophel, is meant for Lord Howard, of Esrick or Escriek, a profligate who laid claim to great piety. Nadab offered incense with strange fire, and was slain by the Lord (Lev. x. 2); and Lord Howard, while imprisoned in the Tower, is said to have mixed the consecrated wafer with a compound of roasted apples and sugar, called lamb’s-wool.

“And canting Nadab let oblivion damn,

Who made new porridge of the paschal lamb.”


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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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N added to Greek words ending in a short vowel to lengthen it “by position,” and “l” added to French words beginning with a vowel
N. H
nth, or nth plus One
Nab
Nab
Nab-man
Nabo or Nebo
Nabob (generally called Nabob)
Nabonassar or Nebo-adon-Assur
Naboth’s Vineyard
Nadab
Nadir
Nadir Shah
Nag
Nag, Nagging
Nag’s Head Consecration
Naga
Naglfar
Nahushtan
Naiads
Nail