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Nag

.

A horse. This is an example of n of the article joined to the following noun, as in the word newt = an ewt. (Danish and Norwegian, og; Anglo-Saxon, eoh or eh; Latin, eq[uus]; Dutch, negge.) Taylor (1630) has naggon, as—

“Wert thou George with thy naggon,

That foughtest with the draggon.”

Shakespeare’s naunt and nuncle are mine-aunt and mine-uncle.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Nab
Nab
Nab-man
Nabo or Nebo
Nabob (generally called Nabob)
Nabonassar or Nebo-adon-Assur
Naboth’s Vineyard
Nadab
Nadir
Nadir Shah
Nag
Nag, Nagging
Nag’s Head Consecration
Naga
Naglfar
Nahushtan
Naiads
Nail
Nail (For want of a)
Nail-money
Nail fixed in the Temple (of Jupiter)

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