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Og

,

in the satire of Absalom and Achitophel, by Dryden and Tate, is Thomas Shadwell, who succeeded Dryden as poet-laureate. Dryden called him MacFlecknoe, and says “he never deviates into sense.” He is called Og because he was a very large and fat man. (Part ii.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Œdipus
Œil
Œil de Bœuf (L)
Off (Saxon, of; Latin, ab, from, away)
Off-hand
Off his Head
Off the Hooks
Off with his Head! So much for Buckingham!
Offa’s Dyke
Og
Og
Oghams
Oghris
Ogier the Dane
Ogleby (Lord)
Ogres
OGroat
Ogygian Deluge
Oi Polloi
Oignement de Bretaigne (French)
Oignons dEgypte