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Ouʹtis (Greek, nobody)

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A name assumed by Odysseus in the cave of Polyphēmos. When the monster roared with pain from the loss of his eye, his brother giants demanded from a distance who was hurting him: “Nobody,” thundered out Polyphemos, and his companions went their way. Odysseus in Latin is Ulysses.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Oui (French for “yes”)
Out
Out-Herod Herod (To)
Out and Out
Out in the Fifteen—i.e
Out in the Forty-five—i.e
Out of Harness
Out of Pocket
Out of Sorts
Out of the Wood
Outis (Greek, nobody)
Outrigger
Outrun the Constable
Outworks
Ouzel
Ovation
Over
Over
Over and Over Again
Over Edom will I cast my Shoe (Psalm lx. 8; cviii. 9)
Over the Left