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Pander

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To pander to one’s vices is to act as an agent to them, and such an agent is termed a pander, from Panʹ-dărus, who procures for Troʹilus the love and graces of Cressida. In Much Ado about Nothing it is said that Troilus was “the first employer of pandars” (v. 2). (Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida; Chaucer: Troilus and Cresseide.)

Let all pitiful goers-between be called to the world’s end after my name, call them all ‘Pandars.ʹ Let all constant men be ‘Trolluses,ʹ all false women be ‘Cressids,ʹ and all brokers-between, ‘Pandars.ʹ Say, Amen.”—Troilus and Cressida, iii. 2.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Pamphyle
Pan
Panacea
Panama
Pancake
Pancaste
Pancras (St.)
Pandarus
Pandects of Justinian (The)
Pandemonium (A)
Pander
Pandora’s Box (A)
Panel (A)
Pangloss (Dr.)
Panic
Panjandrum
Pantables
Pantagruel
Pantagruelion
Pantagruelion Herb (The)
Pantaloon

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Pandarus