- skip - Brewer’s

Pantheʹa

,

wife of Abradatus, King of Susa. Abradatus joined the Assyrians against Cyrus, and his wife was taken captive. Cyrus refused to visit her, that he might not be tempted by her beauty to outstep the bounds of modesty. Abradatus was so charmed by this continence that he joined the party of Cyrus, and, being slain in battle, his wife put an end to her life, and fell on the body of her husband.

“Here stands Lady Rachel Russell—there the arch-virago old Bess of Hardwicke. The one is our English version of Panthēa of Arria; the other of Xantippē in a coif and peaked stomacher.”—Mrs. Lynn Linton: Nineteenth Century, Oct., 1891, p. 605.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Panel (A)
Pangloss (Dr.)
Panic
Panjandrum
Pantables
Pantagruel
Pantagruelion
Pantagruelion Herb (The)
Pantaloon
Pantechnicon
Panthea
Panthea (Greek)
Pantheon
Panther
Panthera
Pantile Shop
Pantomime
Panton Gates
Pantry. (French, paneteric
Panurge
Panyer Stone (The)

Linking here:

Continence of a Scipio