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Patch (To)

.

To express certain political views. The allusion is to the custom, in Queen Anne’s reign, of wearing on the face little black patches. If the patch was on the right cheek, it indicated that the wearer was a Whig; if on the left cheek, that she was a Tory; if on the forehead between the eyes, or on both cheeks, that she was of no political bias. (See Court Plaster.)

“Whatever might be her husband’s politics, she was at liberty to patch as she pleased.”—Nineteenth Century, February, 1890, p. 58.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Passion Flower
Passionists
Passover
Passy-measure or Passing-measure
Passy-measure Pavin
Pasteboard
Paston Letters
Pastorale of Pope Gregory
Patavinity
Patch
Patch (To)
Patelin
Patelinage
Patent Rolls
Pater Noster
Pater Patrum
Paternoster Row (London)
Pathfinder
Patience cry the Lepers
Patient (The)
Patient Grisel