- skip - Brewer’s

Court Plaster

.

The plaster of which the court ladies made their patches. These patches, worn on the face, were cut into the shape of crescents, stars, circles, diamonds, hearts, crosses; and some even went so far as to patch their face with a coach-and-four, a ship in full sail, a château, etc. This ridiculous fashion was in vogue in the reign of Charles I.; and in the reign of Anne was employed as the badge of political partisanship. (See Patches.)

“Your black patches you wear variously,

Some cut like stars, some in half-moons, some lozenges.”


Beaumont and Fletcher: Elder Brother, iii. 2.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Coupon
Courage of One’s Opinion
Courland Weather
Course
Course
Court
Court Circular
Court-cupboard
Court Fools
Court Holy Water
Court Plaster
Court of Love
Court of Pie-powder
Court of the Gentiles (The)
Courtesy
Courtesy Titles
Cousin
Cousin
Cousin Betsy
Cousin-german
Cousin Jack

Linking here:

Patch (To)