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Pisʹtols

.

So called from Pistoja, in Tuscany, where they were invented in 1545. (Latin, pistorium.)

To discharge one’s pistol in the air. To fight a man of straw; to fight harmlessly in order to make up a foolish quarrel.

“Dr. Réyille has discharged his pistol in the air [that is, he pretends to fight against me, but discharges his shot against objections which I never made].”—W. E. Gladstone: Nineteenth Century, November, 1885.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Piper’s News or Hawker’s News, Fiddler’s News
Piping Hot
Pippa Passes
Piræus
Pirie’s Chair
Pirithoös
Pis-aller (French)
Pisanio
Piso’s Justice
Pistol
Pistols
Pistris, Pistrix, Pristis, or Pristrix
Pit-a-pat
Pitch
Pitch and Pay
Pitch into Him
Pitcher
Pitchers
Pithos
Pitri (plur. Pitaras)
Pitt Diamond or The Regent