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Piso’s Justice

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That is Piso’s justice. Verbally right, but morally wrong. Seneca tells us that Piso condemned a man on circumstantial evidence for murder; but when the suspect was at the place of execution, the man supposed to have been murdered exclaimed, “Hold, hold! I am the man supposed to have been killed.” The centurion sent back the prisoner to Piso, and explained the case to him; whereupon Piso condemned all three to death, saying, “Fiat justitia.” The man condemned is to be executed because sentence of death has been passed upon him, and fiat justitia; the centurion is to be executed because he has disobeyed orders, and fiat justitia; the man supposed to have been murdered is to be executed because he has been the cause of death to two innocent men, and fiat justitia ctsi cœlum ruat.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Piper
Piper that Played before Moses (By the)
Piper’s News or Hawker’s News, Fiddler’s News
Piping Hot
Pippa Passes
Piræus
Pirie’s Chair
Pirithoös
Pis-aller (French)
Pisanio
Piso’s Justice
Pistol
Pistols
Pistris, Pistrix, Pristis, or Pristrix
Pit-a-pat
Pitch
Pitch and Pay
Pitch into Him
Pitcher
Pitchers
Pithos