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Poor Man

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The blade-bone of a shoulder of mutton, so called in Scotland. In some parts of England it is termed a “poor knight of Windsor,” because it holds the same relation to Sir Loin as a Windsor knight does to a baronet. Sir Walter Scott tells of a Scotch laird who, being asked by an English land-lord what he would have for dinner, produced the utmost consternation by saying, “I think I could relish a morsel of a poor man.” (See Bride of Lammermoor, chap. xix.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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