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Sir

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Latin, senex; Spanish, señor; Italian, signor; French, sieur; Norman, sire; English, sir. According to some, Greek αναξ is connected with Sir; on the analogy of εμ-μι (ειμι) = Latin sum; αμπερεζ = Latin semper; oπoζ = Latin sapa.

Sir (a clerical address). Clergymen had at one time Sir prefixed to their name. This is not the Sir of knighthood, but merely a translation of the university word domĭnus given to graduates, as “Dominus Hugh Evans,” etc.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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