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Rig

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A piece of fun, a practical joke. The Scotch say of a man who indulges in intoxication, “He goes the rig.” The same word is applied in Scotland to a certain portion or division of a field. A wanton used to be called a rig. (French, se rigoler, to make merry.)

“He little thought when he set out

Of running such a rig.”


Rig. To dress; whence rigged out, to rig oneself, to rig a ship, well-rigged, etc. (Anglo-Saxon, wrigan, to dress; hrœgl, a garment.)


Jack was rigged out in his gold and silver lace, with a feather in his cap.”—LʹEstrange.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Riderhood (Rogue)
Ridicule (Father of)
Riding [of Yorkshire]
Ridolphus (in Jerusalem Delivered)
Ridotto (Italian)
Rienzi (Nicolò Gabrini)
Rif of Rifie (French)
Riff-raff
Rifle
Rift in the Lute (A)
Rig
Rig-Marie
Rigadoon
Rigdum Funnidos
RightFoot
Right Foot Foremost
Right Hand
Right as a Trivet
Right of Way (The)
Rights
Riglet