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Rotten Row

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Muster row. Camden derives the word from rotteran (to muster); hence rot, a file of six soldiers. Another derivation is the Norman Ratten Row (roundabout way), being the way corpses were carried to avoid the public thoroughfares. Others suggest Route du roi; and others the Anglo-Saxon rot, pleasant, cheerful; or rotten, referring to the soft material with which the road is covered.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ross (Celtic)
Rosse
Rossel
Rossignol (French)
Rostrum
Rota or Rota Men
Rota Aristotelica (Aristotle’s wheel)
Rota Romana
Rote
Rothschild [Red Shield]
Rotten Row
Rotundity of the Belt (Washington Irving)
Roué
Rouen
Rouge (A)
Rouge Croix
Rouge Dragon
Rouge et Noir (French, red and black)
Rough-hewn
Rough Music
Rough-shod