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Rue

,

calledherb of grace,” because it was employed for sprinkling holy water. Without doubt it was so used symbolically, because to rue means to be sorry, and penitence brings the water of grace with it. (Latin, ruta, from the Greek rhuo, so called because it sets persons free from disease and death.) (See Difference.) Ophelia says—

“There’s rue for you, and here’s some for me! we may call it herb of graceʹ Sundays.”—Shakespeare: Hamlet, iv. 5.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ruchiel
Rudder
Ruddock
Ruddy-mane [Bloody-hand]
Rudge (Barnaby)
Rudiger
Rudolphine Tables (The)
Rudolstadt (La Comtesse de)
Rudra
Rue
Rue
Rue
Ruffe
Ruffian Hall
Rufus (The Red)
Ruggiero
Rukenaw (Dame)
Rule (St.) or St. Regulus
Rule, Britannia
Rule Nisi
Rule of Thumb (The)