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Sabriʹna (Latin)

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The Severn. In Milton’s Comus we are told she is the daughter of Locrine “that had the sceptre from his father, Brute,” and was living in concubinage with Estrildis. His queen, Guendolen, vowed vengeance against Estrildis and her daughter, gathered an army together, and overthrew Locrine by the river Sture. Sabrina fled and jumped into the river. Nereus took pity on her, and made her “goddess of the Severn.” which is poetically called Sabriʹna.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sabeans
Sabeanism
Sabeism
Sabellians
Sabiens
Sable
Sable black
Sablonnière (La)
Sabra
Sabreur
Sabrina (Latin)
Saccharine Principle in Things (The)
Saccharissa
Sacco Benedetto or Saco Bendito [the blessed sack or cloak]
Sachem
Sachentege
Sack
Sack
Sack Race (A)
Sackbut
Sackerson

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Severn