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Salic Law

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The law so called is one chapter of the Salian code regarding succession to salic lands, which was limited to heirs male to the exclusion of females, chiefly because certain military duties were connected with the holding of those lands. In the fourteenth century females were excluded from the throne of France by the application of the Salic law to the succession of the crown.

“Which Salique, as I said, twixt Elbe and Sala,

Is at this day in Germany called Meisen.”


Shakespeare: Henry V., i. 2

⁂ Philippe VI. of France, in order to raise money, exacted a tax on salt, called Gabelle, which was most unpopular and most unjustly levied. Edward III. called this iniquitous tax “Philippe’s Salic law.” (Latin, sal, salt.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sal Prunella
Salacacabia or Salacacaby of Apicius
Salace
Salad Days
Salamander
Salamander’s Wool
Salary
Salchichon
Sale by the Candle
Salem
Salic Law
Saliens (The)
Salient Angles
Salisbury Cathedral
Salisbury Craigs
Sallee
Sallust of France
Sally
Sally Lunn
Sallyport
Salmacis

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Salic Law