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Sinʹister (Latin, on the left hand)

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According to augury, birds, etc., appearing on the left-hand side forbode ill-luck; but, on the right-hand side, good luck. Thus, corva sinistra (a crow on the left-hand) is a sign of ill-luck which belongs to English superstitions as much as to the ancient Roman or Etruscan. (Virgil: Eclogues, i. 18.)

That raven on yon left-hand oak

(Curse on his ill-betiding croak)

Bodes me no good.”


Gay: Fable xxxvii.

Sinister. (See Bar Sinister.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sing Old Rose
Sing Out
Sing-su-hay
Singapores
Singing Apple
Singing-Bread
Singing Chambermaids
Singing Tree
Singing in Tribulation
Single-Speech Hamilton
Sinister (Latin, on the left hand)
Sinning One’s Mercies
Sinon
Sintram
Sir
Sir Oracle
Sir Roger de Coverley
Siren
Sirius
Sirloin of Beef
Sisyphus (Latin; Sisuphos, Greek)

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