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Spitting for Luck

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Boys often spit on a piece of money given to them for luck. Boxers spit upon their hands for luck Fishwomen not unfrequently spit upon their hansel (i.e. the first money they take) for luck. Spitting was a charm against fascination among the ancient Greeks and Romans. Pliny says it averted witchcraft, and availed in giving to an enemy a shrewder blow.

“Thrice on my breast I spit to guard me safe

From fascinating charms.”


Theocritos

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Spirit-writing
Spirits
Spirits (Elemental)
Spirited Away
Spiritual Mother
Spiritualism or Spiritism
Spirt or Spurt
Spitalfields (London)
Spite of His Teeth (In)
Spitfire
Spitting for Luck
Spittle or Spital
Spittle Sermons
Splay
Spleen
Splendid Shilling
Splice
Splice the Main Brace
Spoke (verb)
Spoke (noun)
Sponge