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Subʹsidy

means literally a sediment; that which is on the ground. It is a military term. In battle the Romans drew up their army in three divisions: first, the light-armed troops made the attack, and, if repulsed, the pike-men came up to their aid; if these two were beaten back, the swordsmen (prinʹcipes) advanced; and if they too were defeated, the reserve went forward. These last were called subsidies because they remained resting on their left knee till their time of action. Metaphorically, money aid is called a subsidy. (Latin, subsideo, to subside.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sub Cuitro Liquit
Sub Hasta
Sub Jove (Latin)
Sub-Lapsarian, Supra-Lapsarian
Sub Rosa
Sublime Port
Sublime Porte (The)
Submerged (The) or The Submerged Tenth
Submit
Subpœna
Subsidy
Substitution of Service (The)
Subtle Doctor
Subvolvans or Subvolvani
Succession Powder
Succinct
Succoth
Suck the Monkey
Sucking Young Patricians
Suckle
Sucre