- skip - Brewer’s

Sundew

,

the Drosĕra, which is from the Greek drosos, dew. So called from the dew-like drops which rest on the hairy fringes of the leaves.

By the lone fountain’s secret bed,

Where human footsteps rarely tread;

Mid the wild moor or silent glen,

The sundew blooms unseen by men,

And, ere the summer’s sun can rise,

Drinks the pure water of the skies.”


previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Sun
Sun (The)
Sun-burst
Sun Inn
Sun and Moon Falling
Sun in one’s Eyes (To have the)
Sun of Righteousness
Sunday
Sunday Saint
Sundays
Sundew
Sunflower (The)
Sunna or Sonna
Sunnites
Suo Jure (Latin)
Suo Marte (Latin)
Super, Supers
Supercilious
Supernaculum
Superstition
Supped all his Porridge (He has)