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Thisbe

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A Babylonish maiden beloved by Pirămus. They lived in contiguous houses, and as their parents would not let them marry, they contrived to converse together through a hole in the garden wall. On one occasion they agreed to meet at Ninusʹ tomb, and Thisbe, who was first at the spot, hearing a lion roar, ran away in a fright, dropping her garment on the way. The lion seized the garment and tore it. When Piramus arrived and saw the garment, he concluded that a lion had eaten Thisbe, and he stabbed himself. Thisbe returning to the tomb, saw Piramus dead, and killed herself also. This story is travestied in the Midsummer Night’s Dream, by Shakespeare.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Thin-skinned
Thin Red Line (The)
Thin as a Whipping-post
Think about It (Ill)
Thirteen Unlucky
Thirteens
Thirteenpence-halfpenny
Thirty
Thirty Tyrants
Thirty Years War
Thisbe
Thistle (The)
Thistle Beds
Thistle of Scotland
Thomas (St.)
Thomas-a-Kempis
Thomas the Rhymer
Thomasing
Thomists
Thomson (James)
Thone

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Thisbe