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Troy-town

has no connection with the Homeric “Troy,” but means a maze, labyrinth, or bower. (Welsh troi, to turn; troedle, a trodden place [? street], whence the archaic trode, a path or track; Anglo-Saxon thraw-an, to twist or turn.) There are numerous Troys and Troy-towns in Great Britain and North America. The upper garden of Kensington Palace was called “the siege of Troy.”

⁂ A Troy-town is about equivalent to “Julian’s Bower,” mentioned in Halliwell’s Archaic Dictionary.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Trophonios (Greek)
Troubadours
Trouble
Trouillogan’s Advice
Trout
Trouveres
Trovatore (Il)
Trows
Troxartas [bread-eater]
Troy-Novant (London)
Troy-town
Troy Weight
Truce of God
Truces
Truchuela
True Blue
True-lovers Knot
True as Touch
True Thomas and the Queen of Elfiand
Truepenny
Trulli