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Tyburn

is Twa-burne, the “two rivulets;” so called because two small rivers met in this locality.

Tyburn’s triple tree. A gallows, which consists of two uprights and a beam resting on them. Previous to 1783 Tyburn was the chief place of execution in London, and a gallows was permanently erected there. In the reign of Henry VIII. the average number of persons executed annually in England was 2,000. The present number is under twelve.

Kings of Tyburn. Public executioners. (See Hangmen.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Twitcher
Twitten
Two
Two Eyes of Greece
Two Fridays
Two Gentlemen of Verona
Two Strings to his Bow (He has)
Two of a Trade never agree
Twopenny Dam (A)
Tybalt
Tyburn
Tyburn Ticket
Tyburnia (London)
TYear—i.e
Tyke
Tyler Insurrection
Tylwyth Teg [the Fair Family]
Type
Typhœus
Typhon
Typhoon