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Walk (in Hudibras)

is Colonel Hewson, so called from Gayton’s tract.

To walk. This is a remarkable word. It comes from the Anglo-Saxon wealcan (to roll); whence wealcere, a fuller of cloth. In Percy’s Reliques we read—

“She cursed the weaver and the walker,

The cloth that they had wrought.”

To walk, therefore, is to roll along, as the machine in felting hats or fulling cloth.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Waiters upon Providence
Waits
Wake
“Waking a Witch.”
Walbrook Ward (London)
Walcheren Expedition
Waldemar’s Way
Waldenses
Waldo
Wales
Walk (in Hudibras)
Walk Chalks
Walk Spanish
Walk not in the Public Ways
Walk the Plank (To)
Walk through One’s Part (To)
Walker
Walker’s Bus
Walking Gentleman (A)
Walking Sword (A)
Walkyries (The)