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Way-bit

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A Yorkshire way-bit. A large overplus. Ask a Yorkshireman the distance of any place, and he will reply so many miles and a way-bit (wee-bit); but the way-bit will prove a frightful length to the traveller who imagines it means only a little bit over. The High-landers say, “A mile and a bittock,” which means about two miles.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Water Stock (To)
Water of Jealousy (The)
Water Tasting like Wine
Waters (Sanitary)
Waterloo Cup (The)
Waterworks (The)
Watling Street
Watteau
Wave
Wax-bond End (A)
Way-bit
Ways and Means
Wayfaring Tree (The)
Wayland
Wayland Smith’s Cave
Wayland Wood (near Watton, Norfolk)
Wayleaves
Wayzgoose
We
We Three
We Left Our Country for Our Country’s Good