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Wharton

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Philip Wharton, Duke of Northumberland, described by Pope in the Moral Essays in the lines beginning—

“Wharton, the scorn and wonder of our days.”

A most brilliant orator, but so licentious that he wasted his patrimony in drunkenness and self-indulgence. He was outlawed for treason, and died in a wretched condition at a Bernardine convent in Catalonia. (1698–1731.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Wet-bob and Dry-bob
Wet Finger (With a)
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Weyd-monat
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Whalebone
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Wheel of Fortune (The)
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Whetstone of Witte (The)