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Wet Finger (With a)

,

easily, directly. “Dʹun tour de main.” The allusion is to the old custom of spinning, in which the spinner constantly wetted the forefinger with the mouth.

“I can bring myself round with a wet finger.”—Sir W. Scott: Redgauntlet, chap. xxiii. (and in many other places).


“The spirit being grieved and provoked… . will not return again with a wet finger.”—Gouge: Whole Armour of God, p. 458 (1616).


“I can find


Ono with a wet finger that is stark blind.”


Trial of Love and Fortune (1598).


Flores. “Canst thou bring me thither?

Peasant. With a wet finger.”


Wisdom of Dr. Dodypoll (1600).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Welsher
Wench (A)
Werner
Werther
Werwolf (French, loup-garou)
Wesleyan
Wessex, or West Saxon Kingdom
Westmoreland [Land of the West Moors]
Wet
Wet-bob and Dry-bob
Wet Finger (With a)
Wetherell (Elizabeth)
Wexford Bridge Massacre
Weyd-monat
Whale
Whale
Whalebone
Wharncliffe
Wharton
What we Gave we Have, What we Spent we Had, What we Had we Lost
What’s What

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Finger. (Anglo-Saxon, finger)