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Yoʹke (1 syl.)

.

Greek zugon, Latin jugum, French joug, Dutch juk, German joch, Anglo-Saxon geoc (pron. yoc).

To pass under the yoke. To suffer the disgrace of a vanquished army. The Romans made a yoke of three spears—two upright and one resting on them. When an army was vanquished, the soldiers had to lay down their arms and pass under this archway of spears.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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