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York

,

when it was Saxon, was called Eorwic, and the legend is that a Duke of Effroc being drowned at the foot of the wall caused this name to be given to the city. Southwark Wall was also called the Effroc Wall or Stone. (Victor Hugo: LʹHomme qui Rit, pt. ii. bk. iii. 1.)

York is Eure-wic (pron. Yorric), and means the town on the Eure, now called the Ouse. The Romans Latinised the word Eure or Eure into “Evora” or “Ebora,” and wic into “vicum;” whence Ebora-vicum, contracted into Eborʹacum.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Yeoman (A)
Yeoman’s Service
Yeomen of the Guard
Yeth-Hounds
Yezd
Yggdrasil
Ymir
Yniol
Yoke
Yorick
York
York Stairs (London)
Yorks (a Stock-Exchange term)
Yorkshire
Young Chevalier
Young England
Young Germany
Young Italy
Your Petitioners shall ever Pray
Youth Restored
Ysolde, Ysonde

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York