Aristotle (385322 B.C.)

Aristotle (Ar`istotle) , a native of Stagira, in Thrace, and hence named the Stagirite; deprived of his parents while yet a youth; came in his 17th year to Athens, remained in Plato's society there for 20 years; after the death of Plato, at the request of Philip, king of Macedon, who held him in high honour, became the preceptor of Alexander the Great, then only 13 years old; on Alexander's expedition into Asia, returned to Athens and began to teach in the Lyceum, where it was his habit to walk up and down as he taught, from which circumstance his school got the name of Peripatetic; after 13 years he left the city and went to Chalcis, in Euboea, where he died. He was the oracle of the scholastic philosophers and theologians in the Middle Ages; is the author of a great number of writings which covered a vast field of speculation, of which the progress of modern science goes to establish the value; is often referred to as the incarnation of the philosophic spirit (385322 B.C.).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Aristophanes * Aristox`enus of Tarentum
Aristar`chus of Samos
Aristarchus of Samothrace
Ariste`as
Aristi`des
Aristion
Aristip`pus of Cyrene
Aristobu`lus I.
Aristode`mus
Aristom`enes
Aristophanes
Ar`istotle
Aristox`enus of Tarentum
A`rius
Arizo`na
Ark of the Covenant
Arkans`as
Arkwright, Sir Richard
Arlberg
Arles
Ar`lincourt, Viscount d'
Ar`lington, Henry Bennet, Earl of

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Aristotle in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable