Dunbar (14801520)

Dunbar, William, a Scottish poet, entered the Franciscan order and became an itinerant preaching friar, in which capacity he wandered over the length and breadth of the land, enjoying good cheer by the way; was some time in the service of James IV., and wrote a poem, his most famous piece, entitled “The Thistle and the Rose,” on the occasion of the King's marriage with the Princess Margaret Tudor, daughter of Henry VII. His poems were of three classes—allegoric, moral, and comic, the most remarkable being “The Dance,” in which he describes the procession of the seven deadly sins in the infernal regions. Scott says he “was a poet unrivalled by any that Scotland has produced” (14801520).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Dunbar * Dunblane
Dumfriesshire
Dumnorix
Dumont, Augustin-Alexandre
Dumont, Jean
Dumont, Louis
Dumont d'Urville, Jules
Dumoulin
Dumouriez
Düna
Dunbar
Dunbar
Dunblane
Duncan, Adam, Viscount
Duncan, Thomas
Dunciad, The
Duncker, Max
Duncombe, T. S.
Dundalk
Dundas
Dundas, Henry, Viscount Melville
Dundee