Encyclopædia

Encyclopædia, a name of Greek derivation, given to works which embrace within their pages a more or less complete account, in alphabetical order, of the whole round of human knowledge, or of some particular section of it. Attempts in this direction were made as far back as Aristotle's day, and various others have since been made from time to time, according as the circle of knowledge widened. Amongst famous encyclopædias which have appeared, mention may be made of the French Encyclopédie” (q.v.); the “Encyclopædia Britannica,” Edinburgh (1708-1771), now in its ninth edition (1889); the German “Encyclopedie,” begun in 1818 by Ersch and Gruber, and not yet completed, although 170 volumes have appeared; while the largest of all is the Chinese encyclopædia, in 5020 vols., printed in Pekin in 1726.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Encyclical Letter * Encyclopédie
Empyrean
Ems
Enamel
Encaustic Painting
Enceladus
Enceladus, Manuel Blanco
Enchiridion of Epictetus
Encina
Encke, Johann Franz
Encyclical Letter
Encyclopædia
Encyclopédie
Encyclopedist
Endemic
Endogens
Endor
Endosmose
Endymion
Eneid
Energy, Conservation of
Enfantin, Barthélemy Prosper

Nearby

Links here from Chalmers

Burke, Edmund
Busch, John George
Huygens, Christian
Whytt, Robert