Pisistratus

Pisistratus, tyrant of Athens, was the friend of Solon and a relative; an able but an ambitious man; being in favour with the citizens presented himself one day in the Agora, and displaying some wounds he had received in their defence, persuaded them to give him a bodyguard of 50 men, which grew into a larger force, by means of which in 560 B.C. he took possession of the citadel and seized the sovereign power, from which he was shortly after driven forth; after six years he was brought back, but compelled to retire a second time; after 10 years he returned and made good his ascendency, reigning thereafter peacefully for 14 years, and leaving his power in the hands of his sons Hippias and Hipparchus; he was a good and wise ruler, and encouraged the liberal arts, and it is to him we owe the first written collection or complete edition of the poems of Homer (600-527 B.C.).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Pisidia * Pistoia
Piræus
Pirano
Pirithous
Pirke Aboth
Pirna
Pisa
Pisano, Nicola
Pisgah
Pishin
Pisidia
Pisistratus
Pistoia
Pistol, Ancient
Pistole
Pit`aka`
Pitaval
Pitcairn Island
Pitcairne, Archibald
Pithom
Pitman, Sir Isaac
Pitrè, Giuseppe

Nearby

Links here from Chalmers

Anacreon
Solon
Æsop