Prescott, William Hickling (17961859)

Prescott, William Hickling, American historian, born at Salem, Massachusetts; son of a lawyer; graduated at Harvard in 1814, and applied himself to study law; by-and-by he travelled in Europe, married, and turned to literature as a profession; growing blind, the result of an accident at college, he fortunately inherited means, employed assistants, and with great courage in 1826 began to study Spanish history. “Ferdinand and Isabella” appearing in 1838, established his reputation in both worlds; “The Conquest of Mexico” was published in 1843, and “The Conquest of Peru” in 1847; he was elected corresponding member of the French Institute; his style is vivid, direct, and never dull; though not philosophical, his histories are masterpieces of narrative and incident; he died of apoplexy at Boston before completing the “History of Philip II.” (17961859).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Presbyterianism * Present Time
Precession of the Equinoxes
Précieuses Ridicules
Predestination
Predicables
Pregel
Prejevalski, Nicholas
Pre-Raphaelitism
Presburg
Presbyopia
Presbyterianism
Prescott, William Hickling
Present Time
President of the United States
Press-Gang
Pressensé, Edmond de
Prester, John
Preston
Pretenders, The
Pretoria
Prévost d'Exiles, Antoine François
Prévost-Paradol, Lucien Anatole