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Wick, Wicked

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and in French Méche, Méchant. That the two English words and the two French words should have similar resemblances and similar meanings is a remarkable coincidence, especially as the two adjectives are quite independent of the nouns in their etymology. “Wick” is the Anglo-Saxon weoce, a rush or reed, but “wicked” is the Anglo-Saxon wæc or wac, vile. So “méche” is the Latin mywa-a wick, but “méchant” is the old French meschæanʹt, unlucky.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Whitewashed
Whit-leather
Whitsunday
Whittington
Whittle (A)
Whittle Down
Whitworth Gun
Whole Duty of Man
Whole Gale (A)
Whom the Gods Love Die Young [Herodotos]
Wick, Wicked
Wicked Bible
Wicked Prayer Book (The)
Wicked Weed (The)
Wicket-gate
Wicliffe (John)
Wide-awake
Widenostrils
Widow
Widow (in Hudibras)
Widow Bird